Instead, that school and others across the country are seeing more applicants. Texas Tech has even increased its class size by 30 students a year to help put more doctors in practice. 

There was one thing that stood out as we worked to get the facts behind this large, controversial and at times confusing bill. Everyone said the law is well-intentioned, but flawed. Yet, there is still hope that both sides can come together to fix what needs to be fixed.

“It has potential,” Dr. Peck said. “I feel like most people in medicine feel like there is something broken and we need to work on that.”

“It either will or it will go to the brink of disaster like we did in the most recent financial crisis,” Dr. Shultz said. “And things will begin to fall apart and then we'll act out of crisis rather than act in a much more adult and responsible way.”

“The two parties at some point have to come together to make this a better bill for all of us,” Dr. King said.

Open enrollment for the marketplace ends March 31, with coverage beginning as early as Jan. 1. The state of Texas has opted out of the Medicaid expansion and has left the marketplace in the hands of the federal government.

KTXS News will feature Part 2 of our special report series, Healthcare in America, Tuesday when we take a closer look at what is inside the Affordable Care Act.