ABILENE, Texas -

Hundreds of people in Abilene met Monday to march across the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Bridge and look back at how different the world is since racial discrimination was outlawed in 1964.

"He (MLK) said that hate can't drive out hate, only love can do that. And darkness can't drive out darkness, only light can do that," McMurry University Assistant Chaplain Timothy Palmer said.  

Martin Luther King, Jr. was a pastor, an activist and a leader in the civil rights movement. He preached non-violence and helped lead America out of segregation.

For the last 50 years people have recited his “I have a dream” speech in which he said he hoped one day his children would not be judged by the color of their skin.

"God doesn't see skin color and if God does see skin color it's only because that diversity is beautiful," Palmer said. 

People today say Dr. King’s legacy is not just about race – it's about equality for all people.

Many people have said there is still a long way to go.

"We're not free and things are not equal. All you know (is) there’s lots of things that are the same just covered up," said Heloise Munson, who marched in Abilene on Monday. 

Thanks to Dr. King, Americans are one step closer to equality.

"I'm hoping that wherever he is you could look down and see that part of his dream has come to pass," Munson said.

Dr. King was assassinated in Memphis in 1968 at the age of 39. King would have been 85 this year.