Keith Allen, the first coach of the Philadelphia Flyers and a former general manager, died Tuesday at age 90.

Allen was the coach from the team's inception in 1967 and served in that role through the 1970 season. He took over as general manager in December 1969 and held the position until 1983.

"Keith was the first coach in the history of the Philadelphia Flyers and a man for whom I have tremendous respect," Flyers chairman Ed Snider said in a release. "In my mind, he was and always will be one of the greatest general managers in the history of hockey. He was known as 'Keith the Thief,' I never knew of a bad deal he made. This team would never have reached the level of success we have had over the past 48 years if it were not for Keith.

"Over the years, he became one of my closest confidants and one of my best friends. I will never forget all of the many memories we shared together. He will sorely be missed by all of us."

Allen constructed the team that won the franchise's only two Stanley Cups in 1974 and 1975. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1992.

"Keith was one of those men who you very rarely come across who was fatherly and grandfatherly to all of us players and our families and yet was tough enough and strong enough to do the things that were necessary for us to win the Stanley Cup," Flyers senior vice president and former player and general manager Bob Clarke said. "Every player who ever played here under his leadership liked Keith. Anyone was traded liked Keith. He may have been the only man in hockey who everybody liked. He didn't have a person who disliked him in the world."